Vulnerability and Marginalized Populations

This discussion board forum will focus on Chapter 7 of the textbook, Vulnerability and Marginalized Populations, Jennifer Doudna’s TED talk, How CRISPR Lets us Edit our DNA, Lujun Wang’s TED talk, How to Create a World Where No One Dies Waiting on a Transplant, and the Believed podcast, The Parents. Please see attached instructions and text pages if you wish to write on that.

Jennifer Doudna: How CRISPR lets us edit our DNA | TED Talk

Luhan Yang: How to create a world where no one dies waiting for a transplant | TED Talk

The Parents Who Were, Unwillingly And Unknowingly, Witnesses To Their Children’s : Believed : NPR

This discussion board forum will focus on Chapter 7 of the textbook, Vulnerability and Marginalized Populations, Jennifer Doudna’s TED talk, How CRISPR Lets us Edit our DNA, Lujun Wang’s TED talk, How to Create a World Where No One Dies Waiting on a Transplant, and the Believed podcast, The Parents. Please see attached instructions and text pages if you wish to write on that.

Jennifer Doudna: How CRISPR lets us edit our DNA | TED Talk

Luhan Yang: How to create a world where no one dies waiting for a transplant | TED Talk

The Parents Who Were, Unwillingly And Unknowingly, Witnesses To Their Children’s : Believed : NPR

This discussion board forum will focus on Chapter 7 of the textbook, Vulnerability and Marginalized Populations, Jennifer Doudna’s TED talk, How CRISPR Lets us Edit our DNA, Lujun Wang’s TED talk, How to Create a World Where No One Dies Waiting on a Transplant, and the Believed podcast, The Parents. Please see attached instructions and text pages if you wish to write on that.

Jennifer Doudna: How CRISPR lets us edit our DNA | TED Talk

Luhan Yang: How to create a world where no one dies waiting for a transplant | TED Talk

The Parents Who Were, Unwillingly And Unknowingly, Witnesses To Their Children’s : Believed : NPR

This discussion board forum will focus on Chapter 7 of the textbook, Vulnerability and Marginalized Populations, Jennifer Doudna’s TED talk, How CRISPR Lets us Edit our DNA, Lujun Wang’s TED talk, How to Create a World Where No One Dies Waiting on a Transplant, and the Believed podcast, The Parents. Please see attached instructions and text pages if you wish to write on that.

Jennifer Doudna: How CRISPR lets us edit our DNA | TED Talk

Luhan Yang: How to create a world where no one dies waiting for a transplant | TED Talk

The Parents Who Were, Unwillingly And Unknowingly, Witnesses To Their Children’s : Believed : NPR

This discussion board forum will focus on Chapter 7 of the textbook, Vulnerability and Marginalized Populations, Jennifer Doudna’s TED talk, How CRISPR Lets us Edit our DNA, Lujun Wang’s TED talk, How to Create a World Where No One Dies Waiting on a Transplant, and the Believed podcast, The Parents. Please see attached instructions and text pages if you wish to write on that.

Jennifer Doudna: How CRISPR lets us edit our DNA | TED Talk

Luhan Yang: How to create a world where no one dies waiting for a transplant | TED Talk

The Parents Who Were, Unwillingly And Unknowingly, Witnesses To Their Children’s : Believed : NPR

This discussion board forum will focus on Chapter 7 of the textbook, Vulnerability and Marginalized Populations, Jennifer Doudna’s TED talk, How CRISPR Lets us Edit our DNA, Lujun Wang’s TED talk, How to Create a World Where No One Dies Waiting on a Transplant, and the Believed podcast, The Parents. Please see attached instructions and text pages if you wish to write on that.

Jennifer Doudna: How CRISPR lets us edit our DNA | TED Talk

Luhan Yang: How to create a world where no one dies waiting for a transplant | TED Talk

The Parents Who Were, Unwillingly And Unknowingly, Witnesses To Their Children’s : Believed : NPR

Discuss about epatient theory

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Almost all you will be surprised to learn that the original “e” in epatient did not refer to anything electronic.

What did it mean? Does the original meaning matter today, or is it irrelevant, considering the newer and overwhelmingly more recognized technology-related connotation?

Elaborate on this topic in two paragraphs

Discuss multidimensional nursing care strategies

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Identify multidimensional nursing care strategies for clients with reproductive system disorders.

Scenario

You work in a gynecological office, and your office has been asked to participate in a women’s health fair. The focus of the fair is health promotion. Preventative screening for female reproductive disorders is vital to identify and treat rapidly to produce the best patient outcomes. Preventative screening includes mammogram and Pap smear and should be performed based on recommended age and associated risk factors. To promote preventative screening, your office will be creating brochures to distribute at the health fair.

Culture influences health beliefs. Discuss

Culture influences health beliefs in many parts of the modern-day world. The world’s cultural beliefs have systems of health that many people use to explain various things like disease causes, how to treat, and who to be involved in the treatment process.

Health care practitioners should always consider the cultural beliefs of patients and their loved ones to understand the best ways to be used in giving care. It is important to ask the family about their cultural beliefs and what they think might have caused the accident. This will enable a nurse to understand if the family will be willing to accept the treatment of their patient from the hospital. This information will also play a critical role in the patient’s compliance with the medical procedure being administered. The nurse should also ask about who the decision-makers in the family are and who should be the family spokesperson (Chen, Mak, & Lam, 2020). The nurse should also ask the family if they believe the church is a support system as they cope with their current situation.

A practicing nurse in this situation should be strict to the guidelines given on offering an opportunity to family members to see their patient if the patient’s condition worsens. This act however has associated risks and benefits. Option to witness should not be offered in a situation where it compromises the safety of the family members. A nurse should also consider possible disruptions of the professionals’ efforts to treat the patient (Robinson, 2021). Family members who have experience of such an environment or can stand strong during the whole process should be allowed.

Religious beliefs are associated with patients forgoing needed medical care and life-saving procedures. The mother in this case deeply appreciates the relationship between living healthy and being spiritual. She believes that committing suicide is a disgrace and the dead will go to hell. She is strong in her faith as opposed to the appropriate medical procedures needed. The culture of the mother associates committing suicide with a sinner who is a curse and cannot go to heaven. Spiritual and religious beliefs, as well as associated activities, can interfere with interpreting the causes of death (Chen, Mak, & Lam, 2020). In this situation, the cause of death according to the mother is a curse.

A healthcare practitioner in this case should first respect the mother’s opinion. The mother’s opinion is inclined to her culture and beliefs she has about the dead. A practicing healthcare officer should help the mother understand the causes of the death. In this situation, the patient who commits suicide is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. This disease causes memory destruction and disrupts the normal function of the brain. This is the information that the mother lacks. People suffering from this disease are exposed to great risks of committing suicide. This Filipino man is an example of a patient who had a mild state of the disease. The mother should be informed about the best ways to give home-based care to people living with this mental disorder (Robinson, 2021). She should also be informed about the importance of healthcare facilities in treating diseases that are found in the community.

Answer to peer. One paragraph

Culture influences health beliefs in many parts of the modern-day world. The world’s cultural beliefs have systems of health that many people use to explain various things like disease causes, how to treat, and who to be involved in the treatment process.

Health care practitioners should always consider the cultural beliefs of patients and their loved ones to understand the best ways to be used in giving care. It is important to ask the family about their cultural beliefs and what they think might have caused the accident. This will enable a nurse to understand if the family will be willing to accept the treatment of their patient from the hospital. This information will also play a critical role in the patient’s compliance with the medical procedure being administered. The nurse should also ask about who the decision-makers in the family are and who should be the family spokesperson (Chen, Mak, & Lam, 2020). The nurse should also ask the family if they believe the church is a support system as they cope with their current situation.

A practicing nurse in this situation should be strict to the guidelines given on offering an opportunity to family members to see their patient if the patient’s condition worsens. This act however has associated risks and benefits. Option to witness should not be offered in a situation where it compromises the safety of the family members. A nurse should also consider possible disruptions of the professionals’ efforts to treat the patient (Robinson, 2021). Family members who have experience of such an environment or can stand strong during the whole process should be allowed.

Religious beliefs are associated with patients forgoing needed medical care and life-saving procedures. The mother in this case deeply appreciates the relationship between living healthy and being spiritual. She believes that committing suicide is a disgrace and the dead will go to hell. She is strong in her faith as opposed to the appropriate medical procedures needed. The culture of the mother associates committing suicide with a sinner who is a curse and cannot go to heaven. Spiritual and religious beliefs, as well as associated activities, can interfere with interpreting the causes of death (Chen, Mak, & Lam, 2020). In this situation, the cause of death according to the mother is a curse.

A healthcare practitioner in this case should first respect the mother’s opinion. The mother’s opinion is inclined to her culture and beliefs she has about the dead. A practicing healthcare officer should help the mother understand the causes of the death. In this situation, the patient who commits suicide is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. This disease causes memory destruction and disrupts the normal function of the brain. This is the information that the mother lacks. People suffering from this disease are exposed to great risks of committing suicide. This Filipino man is an example of a patient who had a mild state of the disease. The mother should be informed about the best ways to give home-based care to people living with this mental disorder (Robinson, 2021). She should also be informed about the importance of healthcare facilities in treating diseases that are found in the community.

Answer to peer. One paragraph

Discuss about Acute Bartolinitis

Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

  • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

    • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

      • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

        • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

          • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

            • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

              • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                  • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                    • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                      • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                        • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                          • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                            • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                              • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                                • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                                  • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                                    • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                                      • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

                                        • Soap Note Acute Bartolinitis. Female patient 34 years old. Hispanic.

Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center

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Management of Patients With Complications From Heart Disease

Case Study, Chapter 29, Management of Patients With Complications From Heart Disease

1. George Brown, 72 years of age, is a male patient who is admitted with the diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema secondary to acute left ventricular heart failure. The patient has a history of coronary artery disease that has been treated medically. The patient is anxious, pale, cold, clammy, and dyspneic. The vital signs are: blood pressure 88/50 mm Hg, heart rate 110 bpm, respiratory rate 32 breaths/min, and temperature 97°F. There are bubbling crackles and wheezing throughout the lung fields and the patient is raising frothy blood-tinged clear sputum. The patient’s admission weight is 100 kg.

  1. What first actions should the nurse take and what are the rationales for these actions?

The physician ordered furosemide (Lasix) 40 mg IVP STAT.

  1. What are the actions of furosemide that will help the patient?
  2. What nursing actions should be implemented when administering a diuretic?

2. Carl Edwards is a 75-year-old man with congestive heart failure. Having sustained three myocardial infarctions in the last 10 years, he has decreased left ventricular function. Mr. Edwards takes Digoxin, Capoten, Coreg, and Lasix for management of this disease. Today he presents to the emergency department with fatigue, generalized weakness, and feelings of “skipping” heartbeats. Upon arrival, he is placed on the cardiac monitor, his vital signs are assessed, and an IV is inserted. He currently denies chest pain, but is experiencing some shortness of breath, and is placed on 2 L of oxygen via nasal cannula.

  1. Which of his medications might be contributing to his symptoms of generalized weakness and heart irregularities?
  2.  For what clinical manifestations should you assess to correlate to his left-sided heart failure?
  3. How do his medications treat his congestive heart failure?
  4. How does the hypokalemia affect the effects of Digitalis?Case Study, Chapter 29, Management of Patients With Complications From Heart Disease

    1. George Brown, 72 years of age, is a male patient who is admitted with the diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema secondary to acute left ventricular heart failure. The patient has a history of coronary artery disease that has been treated medically. The patient is anxious, pale, cold, clammy, and dyspneic. The vital signs are: blood pressure 88/50 mm Hg, heart rate 110 bpm, respiratory rate 32 breaths/min, and temperature 97°F. There are bubbling crackles and wheezing throughout the lung fields and the patient is raising frothy blood-tinged clear sputum. The patient’s admission weight is 100 kg.

    1. What first actions should the nurse take and what are the rationales for these actions?

    The physician ordered furosemide (Lasix) 40 mg IVP STAT.

    1. What are the actions of furosemide that will help the patient?
    2. What nursing actions should be implemented when administering a diuretic?

    2. Carl Edwards is a 75-year-old man with congestive heart failure. Having sustained three myocardial infarctions in the last 10 years, he has decreased left ventricular function. Mr. Edwards takes Digoxin, Capoten, Coreg, and Lasix for management of this disease. Today he presents to the emergency department with fatigue, generalized weakness, and feelings of “skipping” heartbeats. Upon arrival, he is placed on the cardiac monitor, his vital signs are assessed, and an IV is inserted. He currently denies chest pain, but is experiencing some shortness of breath, and is placed on 2 L of oxygen via nasal cannula.

    1. Which of his medications might be contributing to his symptoms of generalized weakness and heart irregularities?
    2.  For what clinical manifestations should you assess to correlate to his left-sided heart failure?
    3. How do his medications treat his congestive heart failure?
    4. How does the hypokalemia affect the effects of Digitalis?Case Study, Chapter 29, Management of Patients With Complications From Heart Disease

      1. George Brown, 72 years of age, is a male patient who is admitted with the diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema secondary to acute left ventricular heart failure. The patient has a history of coronary artery disease that has been treated medically. The patient is anxious, pale, cold, clammy, and dyspneic. The vital signs are: blood pressure 88/50 mm Hg, heart rate 110 bpm, respiratory rate 32 breaths/min, and temperature 97°F. There are bubbling crackles and wheezing throughout the lung fields and the patient is raising frothy blood-tinged clear sputum. The patient’s admission weight is 100 kg.

      1. What first actions should the nurse take and what are the rationales for these actions?

      The physician ordered furosemide (Lasix) 40 mg IVP STAT.

      1. What are the actions of furosemide that will help the patient?
      2. What nursing actions should be implemented when administering a diuretic?

      2. Carl Edwards is a 75-year-old man with congestive heart failure. Having sustained three myocardial infarctions in the last 10 years, he has decreased left ventricular function. Mr. Edwards takes Digoxin, Capoten, Coreg, and Lasix for management of this disease. Today he presents to the emergency department with fatigue, generalized weakness, and feelings of “skipping” heartbeats. Upon arrival, he is placed on the cardiac monitor, his vital signs are assessed, and an IV is inserted. He currently denies chest pain, but is experiencing some shortness of breath, and is placed on 2 L of oxygen via nasal cannula.

      1. Which of his medications might be contributing to his symptoms of generalized weakness and heart irregularities?
      2.  For what clinical manifestations should you assess to correlate to his left-sided heart failure?
      3. How do his medications treat his congestive heart failure?
      4. How does the hypokalemia affect the effects of Digitalis?

Discuss various topics related to culture

Discuss cultural psychological and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discuss cultural psychological and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discuss cultural psychological and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discuss cultural psychological and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discuss cultural psychological and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discuss cultural psychological and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Discussion 1 In your discussion post discuss various topics related to a cultural, psychological, and spiritual components in care of a patient.

Assessment and Management of Patients With Rheumatic Disorders

Chapter 39, Assessment and Management of Patients With Rheumatic Disorders

1. Ellie Long, a 55-year-old patient, presents to the pain clinic with the diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome. The nurse at the clinic obtains a history and physical assessment of the patient. (Learning Objective 2)

  1. On what areas should the nurse concentrate when interviewing the patient during the history process?
  2. On what areas should the nurse concentrate when assessing the patient?
  3. What diagnostic tests are used with fibromyalgia syndrome?

2. Julie Walker, a 22-year-old patient, is newly diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). She presented with extreme fatigue; muscle and joint aching and swelling; a butterfly-shaped, flat, red rash across the bridge of the nose; patchy alopecia; a low-grade fever; and loss of appetite. Further workup revealed a positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) titer, anemia, leucopenia, and mild thrombocytopenia. She has an abnormal lipid profile, proteinuria, and hypertension. The liver and renal profiles are within normal range. The physician ordered over-the-counter ibuprofen as needed for joint discomfort, but not to exceed 1,200 mg/day; hydroxychloroquine sulfate (Plaquenil) before meals at the same time each day; and prednisone in tapering doses over the next month. The physician also started the patient on lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor for the hypertension and a statin for the elevated lipids. The clinic nurse is asked by the physician to provide patient and family education. (Learning Objective 5)

  1. What teaching-plan topics should the nurse provide for the patient?Chapter 39, Assessment and Management of Patients With Rheumatic Disorders

    1. Ellie Long, a 55-year-old patient, presents to the pain clinic with the diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome. The nurse at the clinic obtains a history and physical assessment of the patient. (Learning Objective 2)

    1. On what areas should the nurse concentrate when interviewing the patient during the history process?
    2. On what areas should the nurse concentrate when assessing the patient?
    3. What diagnostic tests are used with fibromyalgia syndrome?

    2. Julie Walker, a 22-year-old patient, is newly diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). She presented with extreme fatigue; muscle and joint aching and swelling; a butterfly-shaped, flat, red rash across the bridge of the nose; patchy alopecia; a low-grade fever; and loss of appetite. Further workup revealed a positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) titer, anemia, leucopenia, and mild thrombocytopenia. She has an abnormal lipid profile, proteinuria, and hypertension. The liver and renal profiles are within normal range. The physician ordered over-the-counter ibuprofen as needed for joint discomfort, but not to exceed 1,200 mg/day; hydroxychloroquine sulfate (Plaquenil) before meals at the same time each day; and prednisone in tapering doses over the next month. The physician also started the patient on lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor for the hypertension and a statin for the elevated lipids. The clinic nurse is asked by the physician to provide patient and family education. (Learning Objective 5)

    1. What teaching-plan topics should the nurse provide for the patient?Chapter 39, Assessment and Management of Patients With Rheumatic Disorders

      1. Ellie Long, a 55-year-old patient, presents to the pain clinic with the diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome. The nurse at the clinic obtains a history and physical assessment of the patient. (Learning Objective 2)

      1. On what areas should the nurse concentrate when interviewing the patient during the history process?
      2. On what areas should the nurse concentrate when assessing the patient?
      3. What diagnostic tests are used with fibromyalgia syndrome?

      2. Julie Walker, a 22-year-old patient, is newly diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). She presented with extreme fatigue; muscle and joint aching and swelling; a butterfly-shaped, flat, red rash across the bridge of the nose; patchy alopecia; a low-grade fever; and loss of appetite. Further workup revealed a positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) titer, anemia, leucopenia, and mild thrombocytopenia. She has an abnormal lipid profile, proteinuria, and hypertension. The liver and renal profiles are within normal range. The physician ordered over-the-counter ibuprofen as needed for joint discomfort, but not to exceed 1,200 mg/day; hydroxychloroquine sulfate (Plaquenil) before meals at the same time each day; and prednisone in tapering doses over the next month. The physician also started the patient on lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor for the hypertension and a statin for the elevated lipids. The clinic nurse is asked by the physician to provide patient and family education. (Learning Objective 5)

      1. What teaching-plan topics should the nurse provide for the patient?

Discuss complications associated with diagnosed hypertension

Case Study, Chapter 31, Assessment and Management of Patients With Hypertension

1. Joan Smith, 55 years of age, is a female patient who presents to the intensive care unit with the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. The patient stopped taking her antihypertensives suddenly because of the cost of the medications and she recently lost her job to outsourcing. The patient is slightly drowsy and complains of a headache and blurred vision. The patient’s blood pressure is 220/130 mm Hg upon presentation.

(Learning Objective 6)

  1. According to the definitions set by the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7), which type of hypertensive crisis is the patient currently experiencing?
  2. Describe the treatment goals for handling the hypertensive crisis and apply the goals to the case study. Determine the current mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the goals for treatment.

The physician orders nicardipine hydrochloride (Cardene) 25 mg/250 mL, NS for peripheral IV starting at 2.5 mg/hr, and titrate by 2.5 mg/hr every 15 minutes to reach the goal for the first hour, which is to achieve 25% reduction of the initial MAP.

  • Call the physician if the dosing range of 15 mg/hr has been reached and the MAP is still not at target goal for the first hour of treatment, or up to four dose increases.
  • Lower the BP within 6 hours to 160/100 mm Hg.
  • Adjust the IV rate so that the IV fluids plus the nicardipine IV drip are equal to 100 mL/hr, in total. Call the physician if the IV fluids must go above 100 mL/hr to provide the nicardipine.

c. Explain what rate to set initially for both the nicardipine drip and the NS maintenance fluids.

d. Explain the process of titrating the nicardipine drip for the first hour to achieve the final MAP goal of 25% reduction of the original MAP.

2. The community health nurse is preparing a program about hypertension for a local community center. The focus of the program is on the reduction of risk factors and compliance for those who have been diagnosed with high blood pressure. The target population includes older adults. (Learning Objectives 1 to 4)

  1. The nurse focuses on primary hypertension because it accounts for 90% to 95% of hypertension in the United States. What risk factors does the nurse include for this population?
  2. The nurse prepares to discuss the changes in how the JNC 7 defines hypertension. What ranges and descriptions should the nurse include?
  3. Because this is a gerontologic audience, the nurse needs to review why blood pressure increases with age. Explain how the structural and functional changes of aging contribute to higher blood pressure in the older adult.
  4. What information does the nurse include about lifestyle modifications that may decrease risk of hypertension (or complications associated with diagnosed hypertension)?

Case Study, Chapter 31, Assessment and Management of Patients With Hypertension

1. Joan Smith, 55 years of age, is a female patient who presents to the intensive care unit with the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. The patient stopped taking her antihypertensives suddenly because of the cost of the medications and she recently lost her job to outsourcing. The patient is slightly drowsy and complains of a headache and blurred vision. The patient’s blood pressure is 220/130 mm Hg upon presentation.

(Learning Objective 6)

  1. According to the definitions set by the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7), which type of hypertensive crisis is the patient currently experiencing?
  2. Describe the treatment goals for handling the hypertensive crisis and apply the goals to the case study. Determine the current mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the goals for treatment.

The physician orders nicardipine hydrochloride (Cardene) 25 mg/250 mL, NS for peripheral IV starting at 2.5 mg/hr, and titrate by 2.5 mg/hr every 15 minutes to reach the goal for the first hour, which is to achieve 25% reduction of the initial MAP.

  • Call the physician if the dosing range of 15 mg/hr has been reached and the MAP is still not at target goal for the first hour of treatment, or up to four dose increases.
  • Lower the BP within 6 hours to 160/100 mm Hg.
  • Adjust the IV rate so that the IV fluids plus the nicardipine IV drip are equal to 100 mL/hr, in total. Call the physician if the IV fluids must go above 100 mL/hr to provide the nicardipine.

c. Explain what rate to set initially for both the nicardipine drip and the NS maintenance fluids.

d. Explain the process of titrating the nicardipine drip for the first hour to achieve the final MAP goal of 25% reduction of the original MAP.

2. The community health nurse is preparing a program about hypertension for a local community center. The focus of the program is on the reduction of risk factors and compliance for those who have been diagnosed with high blood pressure. The target population includes older adults. (Learning Objectives 1 to 4)

  1. The nurse focuses on primary hypertension because it accounts for 90% to 95% of hypertension in the United States. What risk factors does the nurse include for this population?
  2. The nurse prepares to discuss the changes in how the JNC 7 defines hypertension. What ranges and descriptions should the nurse include?
  3. Because this is a gerontologic audience, the nurse needs to review why blood pressure increases with age. Explain how the structural and functional changes of aging contribute to higher blood pressure in the older adult.
  4. What information does the nurse include about lifestyle modifications that may decrease risk of hypertension (or complications associated with diagnosed hypertension)?